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RESEARCH DOMAINS

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The Early Career Neuroscience Forum was established in late 2010, although the name changed to the Neuroscience Careers Network in 2014 to encompass the work it does to support group leaders as well as PhD/post-docs.The aim of the network has been to identify and engage with neuroscientists from across the UCL Neuroscience Domain. 

The Neuroscience Careers Network is supported, administratively and financially, by the UCL Neuroscience Domain Steering Group. Their work is specifically aligned to the Neuroscience Domain's key strategic goal to educate, develop, recruit and retain outstanding neuroscientists trained in multiple disciplines.

The Network encourages interaction and mentoring by organising career-advice seminars and grant writing workshops and is very open to talk suggestions from the neuroscience community.

Typical seminars/workshops include Applying for Fellowships, Improve your Grant/Fellowship Writing Skills, Grant writing workshops, Starting up and Independent Career, What can UCL do for you?, How to prepare for Grants, Fellowship and Job Interviews, What to do after you get your PhD? and Alternative Careers for Scientists.

Committee Members

Madeleine Verriotis

Chair of the Network

Madeleine Verriotis

UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health

Email

Madeleine Verriotis is a senior postdoctoral researcher with an interest in mechanisms underlying pain in humans. She works with Dr Suellen Walker at the Institute of Child Health, where she uses a combination of approaches including neuroimaging, quantitative sensory testing, and patient-reported outcome measures to understand the mechanisms associated with chronic pain in children and adolescents.

Prior to this Madeleine worked with Professor Maria Fitzgerald, where she explored the development of cortical pain and somatosensory responses in human infants in a clinical setting using scalp EEG and near-infrared spectroscopy. Madeleine received her PhD in Behavioural Neuroscience at UCL under the supervision of Professor Kate Jeffery. Here, she used in vivo electrophysiology to explore the neural basis of spatial navigation and memory in the rat brain, and undertook projects on human spatial orientation in three dimensions.

Laura Crucianelli Laura Crucianelli

UCL Department of Clinical, Educational, and Health Psychology

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Laura Crucianelli gained a BSc in Psychology and an MSc in Cognitive Neuroscience from University of Bologna, Italy. During her Master degree, she spent 6 months at Heythrop College, University of London, in the context of the European Erasmus programme. She undertook a professional internship at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, conducting research about awareness of illness following stroke.

Laura completed her PhD in 2016 at the Department of Psychology, University of Hertfordshire, and in collaboration with UCL under the supervision of Dr Paul Jenkinson and Dr Katerina Fotopoulou.  Her PhD project investigated affective touch, sense of body ownership and interoceptive awareness in both healthy and clinical populations.

She is currently working as postdoctoral researcher at UCL, investigating the effect of intranasal oxytocin on affective touch and bodily awareness in healthy and Anorexia Nervosa participants. 
Lorenzo Fabrizi

Lorenzo Fabrizi

UCL Research Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology (NPP)

Email

Dr Lorenzo Fabrizi is currently employed as a postdoctoral research scientist in the department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology at University College London in Professor Fitzgerald’s group.

In 2012, Lorenzo was awarded the UCL Early Career Neuroscience prize for his work on the development of nociception in human premature infants.

He graduated in Biomedical Engineering at the Politecnico di Milano University and in 2008 completed his PhD in Medical Physics and Bioengineering at UCL under the supervision of Professor Holder.

His research interest lies in the analysis of bioelectrical signals and functional neuroimages, with a particular application focus on the maturation of human brain functions and the emergence of sensory discrimination.

Sandrine Geranton

Sandrine Geranton

UCL Research Department of Cell and Developmental Biology

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Sandrine Géranton is a Lecturer in molecular neuroscience in the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology. Sandrine studied organic chemistry and biochemistry at the “Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier” in France. After an MSc in biotechnology at the University of the West of England, she joined University College London where she carried out a PhD in the then department of Pharmacology. She went on learning about pain mechanisms as a post-doctoral researcher with the London Pain Consortium in the department of Cell and Developmental Biology at UCL, where she is now Lecturer. Sandrine has always been keen on applying her multidisciplinary background to further her understanding of the molecular biology of pain states and she has been at the forefront of the investigation of the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the development of pain states. Her team has recently uncovered an important role for the stress regulator FKBP51 in the control of chronic pain states and the outcome of their research was published in Science Translational Medicine.
Leonor Goncalves Leonor Goncalves

UCL Research Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology (NPP)

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Leonor is a postdoctoral researcher at the department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology at UCL. Her research focuses on uncovering the role of the amygdala in the processing of pain through in vivo electrophysiology, behavioural studies and pharmacological manipulation. She is especially interested in understanding how the amygdala changes in chronic pain conditions and how these changes might trigger the development of comorbidities. 

Leonor received her PhD in Neurobiology of Pain in 2009 from University of Minho (Portugal) and University of Helsinki (Finland). During her PhD she studied brain plasticity associated with neuropathic pain and mood disorders.  

Before her PhD Leonor spent one year as a trainee at the Neurosurgery Department of Oregon Health and Science University (USA) where she learned extracellular in vivo electrophysiological single cell recordings.

Bethan Kilpatrick Bethan Kilpatrick
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology
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Bethan studied Biology at the University of Sheffield and in 2010 joined UCL to complete an MSc then a PhD in Neuroscience. Now, Bethan is a post-doctoral researcher examining intracellular Ca2+ signalling in health and disease (specifically, Parkinson’s disease). Her project is a collaboration between research groups in the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology and Institute of Ophthalmology.
Julie Lee Julie Lee

Institute of Ophthalmology

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Julie Lee is a second-year PhD student on the Wellcome Trust four-year PhD in Neuroscience. Her interests are broadly in the computational and systems neuroscience of decision-making and reinforcement learning. She did a BSc in Psychology at the University of Bristol, where she was involved in a diverse set of research in cognitive modelling, psycholinguistics, behavioural models of OCD and structural MRI biomarkers of dementia. Currently she is in the laboratory of Profs. Matteo Carandini and Kenneth Harris, where she will use 2-photon calcium imaging to study how the brain changes its responses in the face of different behavioural demands.
Jasper Poort

Jasper Poort

UCL Research Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology (NPP)

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Jasper Poort completed his PhD at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, where he studied neurons in primary visual cortex and higher-level visual areas during figure-ground segregation and visual attention tasks with electrophysiology.

He is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology at UCL. His research is aimed at understanding how the visual cortex selectively processes relevant sensory input to guide behaviour, using 2-photon calcium imaging in mouse visual cortex.

sandrine wauters Sandrine Foti

UCL Institute of Neurology, Queen Square Brain Bank

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Sandrine Wauters is a post-doctoral researcher at the Institute of Neurology, Queen Square Brain Bank (QSBB). Her research focuses on the pathological mechanisms behind Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) as well as studying DNA methylation in multiple system atrophy (MSA). In the future she will be specialising in depicting molecular pathways involved in FTD using post mortem human tissue donated to QSBB.

Sandrine received her PhD in Neuroscience in 2013 from the University of Warwick. During her PhD she studied synaptic plasticity in transgenic mice using molecular, biochemical and electrophysiology laboratory techniques.

Before her PhD, Sandrine did her undergraduate degree at the University of Warwick where she spent one year in Basel (Switzerland) working at Novartis as a student researcher as part of her degree. This year is where her passion for research was unveiled.
Sijia Zhao Sijia Zhao

UCL Ear Institute

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Sijia is a PhD student in Auditory Neuroscience at UCL Ear Institute. She works with Dr Maria Chait and Dr Fred Dick and focuses on understanding how sensitive the human brain is to statistics in rapid, stochastic sounds, by utilising functional brain imaging techniques (EEG, MEG and fMRI), psychophysics and eye-tracking. She is also working on two projects about auditory distraction with NTT in Japan.
She has BSc Neuroscience and MSc Computer Science degrees, both from UCL.